Lost Week: The Top 10 Scenes From Lost


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There have been so many wonderful scenes in Lost over the last six years, it’s tough to pick just 10.

But here goes anyway. This is all from memory – if I did it again tomorrow there might be a few differences but, overall, I think this is a pretty strong representation of the best of Lost. If you think I missed any out, be sure to let me know your favourites in the comments.

The only rule I decided to impose when choosing my list was that the entries had to be proper, full-length scenes that served some sort of purpose in terms of plot or character development. In other words none of the fun little throw-away jokes or brief action-orientated set-pieces – we’ll do that list later in the week.

It goes without saying that the following list contains spoilers if you have not watched up to at least the end of season 5.

So, in descending order:

10. Michael Shoots Anna-Lucia and Libby. We’d seen at least three major characters bite the dust by the time this happened in season two but the way Ana Lucia and Libby died, so sudden and unexpected and at the hands of a friend, means it is still the most shocking death scene in Lost history (though the murder of Ben’s daughter Alex comes close).

9. Ben Saves Locke. Ben Kills Locke. Despairing at his failure to convince the Oceanic Six to return to the island during season four, John Locke decides to end it all. But Ben’s there to save the day. That’s lucky… or not!

8. Destiny Catches Up With Charlie. Despite Desmond’s best attempts to change fate, Charlie was destined to die. But before it happened, in the final episoe of season three, he managed to perform one last heroic deed (though, in saying that, I’ve yet to hear a convincing argument as to why he couldn’t have just shut the door from the other side…):

7. Jack’s Eye and The Crash Site. The opening scene of the very first episode, which hooked us all. Still looks awesome, six years later.

6. Juliet and the Bomb: This one comes in two parts. First, the final scene of season five. Jack believes that detonating an atomic bomb inside one of the island’s weird magnetic pockets in 1977 will return them to their own time and allow everyone to live island-free lives. He drops the bomb down the hole but nothing happens. Then…:

What happened next? We found out Juliet’s fate at the start of season six:

5. Desmond’s Long-Distance Phone Call To Penny. In what may be Lost‘s greatest episode (The Constant: season four, episode five) Desmond is bouncing uncontrollably through time. With the help of Daniel Faraday, he works out that his lost love Penny is his “constant”, who can anchor him to the correct time zone. But for her to do so, he needs to call her from the island in the present, something he can only do if he can persuade her eight years in the past to give him her phone number:

4. Ben Wants Milk. Back in season two, when we didn’t really know whether Ben really was an Other or simple a balloonist who’d been blown off course, this scene provided the first real hint of the darkness within. It also shows exactly why the producers decided that Michael Emerson needed to be added to the main cast instead of their original plan, which was to have him appear for just a few episodes. It comes after “Henry Gale”, as Ben claimed to be called, drew a map showing the location of the remains of his balloon  and Sayid, Ana Lucia and Charlie had set off to find it.

3. Back To The Future With Miles and Hurley. A very funny scene from season five, in which an increasingly exasperated Miles tries to explain the finer points of time travel theory to (the viewers and) a bewildered Hurley… who nonetheless manages to get the final word.

2. Introducing Desmond. The opening scenes of seasons two and three (you can find the latter here) complement each other beautifully. The season two opening gets the nod for this list ahead of the season three intro because it came first, it finally let us see what was inside that hatch they had been teasing us with for most of season one and, of course, it introduced us to Desmond, who would become arguably the show’s most popular character and certainly the most important to solving the riddle of the island (and, I suspect, who will be the key to the story’s resolution). Looking back at this scene, it’s still looks (and sounds) great – but think back to how you felt watching it when it first aired, before you even knew the structure was on the island, before you knew who Desmond was and before you knew what was the deal with that beeping computer.

1. Hoffs/Drawlar: The moment, at the end of season three, that changed everything we thought we knew about Lost

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