Tag Archives: David Lynch

Classic Clips – Red Dwarf and Twin Peaks (Happy Birthday (again) Leanne!)


More share options

Happy New Year from the Choob – and a very Happy Birthday to exiled friend of the Choob, Leanne!

It’s only natural for one to reflect – usually the day after one’s birthday, with a hangover – on another year gone by and the relentless march of time. Just remember, as a wise man once said (well, two wise men, if you count me repeating it), “It’s not the years, honey, it’s the mileage!”

Mind you, given that Leanne is working far, far, far away from her beloved Scotland, in Bermuda, I’m not sure what that implies…

Ahem. Anyway, hope you have a great day/night with your tropical island chums and maybe sip a sherry or two. I know you were home over Christmas but hurry back for another visit soon because we miss you (nothing at all to do with the Bermuda rum cake you bring, nope, no siree, not at all, I took a straw poll and missing you got, ooh, several more votes that the rum cake…).

By way of a birthday present to you from me, here are a few classic clips I think you’ll like. Happy birthday, with love from the Choob!

First up, since you had Cat singing Tongue Tied last year, here’s Rimmer’s Munchkin Song – in fact, the whole Rimmer Experience tour – from the fifth episode of Red Dwarf season 7:

But wait! There’s more. Here is the (very slightly) extended version of the song, introduced by Kryten:

Now, moving on to the awesome Twin Peaks, don’t forget to check out these brilliant Albert scenes and Agent Cooper’s Tibetan crimefighting, which I’ve already spotlighted. But just for you, here’s another couple of great scenes from this awesome show.

First of all, the extended opening credits from the pilot episode – with Angelo Badalamenti‘s beautiful, haunting theme tune, of course – plus the opening scenes of the show that made such an impact on us all back in 1990:

And here’s the legendary, backwards-filmed, Cooper’s dream scene from episode two:

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Classic TV, It's Classic Clip Friday!, Tuesday Is Theme Tunes Day, TV Themes

The Monday Movie – Blue Velvet


More share options

Hollywood hellraiser Dennis Hopper died on Saturday, aged 74, after a battle with prostate cancer.

I remember the first time I saw Hopper in a film. It was 1986 or 87, I was a teenager and I rented Blue Velvet from the local video library. It was also the first David Lynch film I had ever seen and it blew me away, not least because of Hopper’s powerhouse performance in a deeply disturbing role.

He plays Frank Booth, a perverse, sadistic, drug-addicted sociopath who has kidnapped the husband and child of lounge singer Dorothy Vallens (Isabella Rosselini) to force her to become his slave and take part in his bizarre psycho-sexual fantasies.

Clean cut college student Jeffrey Beaumont (Kyle MacLachlan) stumbles into Frank’s dark world, which lurks beneath the seemingly respectable surface of his home town of Lumberton, when he finds a severed ear in a field.

The film marked both a slight shift towards the mainstream for Lynch – which continued a few years later with his TV masterpiece Twin Peaks, which further explored and developed many of the themes from Blue Velvet – and a career rebirth for Hopper, whose own struggles with drugs and violent temper had all-but ostracised him from the mainstream film industry at the time.

Hopper famously read the script for Blue Velvet and told Lynch he had to cast him as Frank Booth because “I AM Frank Booth”.

Here are a couple of his finest moments from Blue Velvet, starting off with the film’s signature scene, which features some memorable lip-synching from co-star Dean Stockwell:

And here is a memorable (for all the wrong reasons) screen kiss:

Leave a comment

Filed under Films, Movies, Obituary, The Monday Movie

It’s Classic Clip Friday: Twin Peaks – Albert Rosenfield Makes An Impact


More share options

David Lynch and Mark Frost‘s televisual masterpiece Twin Peaks is one of the Choob’s all-time top-three TV shows.

In terms of sheer daring, off-the-wall inventiveness and a refreshingly willful refusal to conform to the conventions of prime-time network drama, it’s yet to be matched and likely will never be surpassed. I still live in hope that, some day, Lynch will return to that strange town and give us a proper conclusion to the cliffhanger the series left us with.

The show was full of fascinating characters, ranging from the quirky (Deputy Andy) to the iconic (Special Agent Dale Cooper) to the plain bonkers (the Log Lady).

But my favourite character in Twin Peaks was the fantastic Albert Rosenfield (played brilliantly by Miguel Ferrer, right)), a n FBI forensics expert who, Agent Cooper points out, is a genius but “lacking in some of the social niceties”.

Albert’s arrival at the Twin Peaks’ sheriff’s office proves that warning to be a rare example of an under-statement by Cooper, when he mentions that Albert is “lacking in the social niceties…”:

Things go from bad to worse when Albert tries to examine Laura Palmer’s body:

In the aftermath of that confrontation, Albert gets to deliver the single best speech in the whole of Twin Peaks, pointing out that he is a “nay-sayer and hatchet-man in the fight against violence”:

Albert Rosenfield, the Choob salutes you. Your path was a strange and difficult one…

5 Comments

Filed under Classic TV, It's Classic Clip Friday!