Tag Archives: Jericho

Battlestar Galactica Is Dead – Long Live Caprica


With Battlestar Galactica having reached the end of its journey on Friday (TV movie The Plan notwithstanding) the Caprica publicity machine is really shifting into high gear.

Back in January, the Choob featured an early trailer for and a scene from the pilot episode of the drama.

Now the trailers and previews are coming thick and fast, ahead of the release of an extended version of the pilot episode on DVD on April 21 in the US (a UK release is yet to be confirmed). Based on the pilot, the Sci Fi Channel in the US (which is in the process of rebranding itself as Syfy) has ordered a full 20 episode season, which will begin airing early next year.

Caprica is set 50 years before the events of Battlestar Galactica. It’s billed as more of a family drama and will primarily tell the story of the creation of the technology that spawns the Cylons. It is viewed through the eyes of two families thrown together through a shared tragedy, resulting from a terrorist atrocity, that sets in motion a chain of events that will lead ultimately to the creation of the Cylons and the destruction of Caprica and the rest of the 12 Colonies.

Wealthy industrialist Daniel Graystone (Eric Stoltz) is one of the two main characters. The other is civil liberties lawyer Joseph Adama (played by former NYPD Blue and Jericho star Esai Morales), the father of future Battlestar Galactica commander William Adama.

Here is the latest trailer for the pilot episode:

This next video is a little featurette that includes some new clips plus brief interview snippets from creators/executive producers Ronald D Moore and David Eick and stars Morales and Paula Malcomson, who you might recognise from her role as Trixie in Deadwood and who plays Greystone’s wife Amanda in Caprica.

And finally, here’s another scene from the pilot:

Vodpod videos no longer available.

 

 

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TV Newsround: Seinfeld Returns; Skeet Returns; Red Dwarf Returns; The Wire Arrives; Jensen Departs; And More…


THE four main stars of Seinfeld will be reunited on screen in a scripted show for the first time since the sitcom ended (11 years ago) in the upcoming seventh season of Curb Your Enthusiasm.

Jerry Seinfeld, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Jason Alexander and Michael Richards will appear in a multi-episode story arc of the HBO show, which was, of course, created by and stars Seinfeld’s co-creator Larry David (and on whom the Seinfeld character George Costanza was based).

The first three actors have all previously appeared individually as themselves on Curb Your Enthusiasm but it will be Richards’ first time on the show, and his first TV role since the row over his use of racial slurs while confronting a heckler during a stand-up comedy gig in 2006.

Curb Your Enthusiasm‘s seventh season is currently filming and will air later in the year.

WHILE Jericho fans take some comfort in the recent announcement of the story continuing in comic-book form, and while they await news on the proposed movie follow-up moving forward, there’s good news for fans of the show’s star, Skeet Ulrich.

He’s headed back to TV drama, after landing the lead role in the CBS pilot Back.

He’ll play a man who suddenly turns up at his home, eight years after being reported missing in the aftermath of the September 11 attack on New York.

Mark Pellington will direct from a script written by CSI: Miami’s Dean Widenmann.

DETAILS of the plot for the three-part Red Dwarf reunion (below), due to be broadcast on UK cable channel Dave at Easter, are up on the channel’s website now. Click here to see them.

OUTSTANDING police drama The Wire is finally heading for terrestrial TV in the UK. BBC2 have announced they will air all 60 episodes, spread over five seasons, on a nightly schedule, starting in the Spring.

The acclaimed HBO-produced drama – created and mostly written by David Simon, a former newspaper crime reporter in Baltimore – investigates the drug trade and corruption that is rife in the city, as seen through the eyes of various groups, including the police, the dealers and their underlings, politicians, trade union leaders and, in the final season, the newspaper industry.

ACTRESS Rebecca Romijn, best known as the shape-shifting mutant Mystique (right) in the X-Men movies, has grabbed the lead role in ABC’s Eastwick pilot. You might say she got the role out of the blue… Ahem. Sorry. 

Romijn, who also recently appeared in Ulgly Betty, will play Roxie in the drama, based on the John Updike novel The Witches Of Eastwick and the 1987 movie of the same name

TALKING of Ugly Betty, Scottish actress Ashley Jensen will bow out of the show at the end of the current season. She’s joined the cast of CBS comedy pilot Accidentally On Purpose, which stars Jenna Elfman as a movie critic who discovers she is pregnant after a fling with a younger man.

ACCORDING to Entertainment Weekly, long-running CBS  procedural dramas Without A Trace and Cold Case are facing the axe.

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Jericho Returns!


Yes, it’s the show that just won’t die and now it has been officially announced that the Jericho story is set to continue. But not in the way you might have expected.

You may remember that almost two months ago, the Choob reported news of a possible big-screen continuation of the Jericho story, albeit one that would leave the TV show’s small-town setting (and most of the characters) behind to look at the wider effects of the nuclear attacks on America and the efforts to rebuild. 

It’s all gone quiet on the movie front since then but CBS have now announced that the story of the town of Jericho itself, and the TV show’s characters, will continue – in a comic book series.

Jericho debuted on CBS back in September 2006. It told the story of a major nuclear attack on the United States, the resultant breakdown in society and the in-fighting and power struggles that followed, all seen from the perspective of the residents of Jericho, a small rural farming town in Kansas.

Mediocre ratings led to the show’s cancellation, with the season ending on a  massive cliffhanger. A highly successful internet campaign by fans saw the show renewed for a seven-episode second season but the viewing figures failed to improve and the show was cancelled for a second, final time.

Those extra episodes did give some closure to the main storyline that had been running through the first season but many plot threads were still left dangling.

Now those loose ends are set to be addressed in a comic book series, due to be published by Devil’s Due Publishing in the Autumn, which picks right up where the TV show left off.

The show’s co-executive producer Dan Shotz said: “Jericho is alive and well, thanks to the amazing fans who’ve driven us to find new and fresh ways to tell the Jericho story.

“The DDP team are great partners and have shown a true love for our show. We are so thrilled about this comic book series and the endless possibilities for the future of Jericho.”

Joining Shotz in developing the comic book will be most of the original creative team, including Jon Turteltaub, Carol Barbee, Karim Zreik, and Jon Steinberg.

DDP President Josh Blaylock added: “I can’t tell you how cool it is for DDP to be able to continue the Jericho story in comic book form.

“We plan to give fans the story they’ve been craving. This is going to be epic stuff.”

Jericho is just the latest cancelled TV show to get an official comic book continuation.

The Choob reported last month how The Middleman’s final episode, which was unfilmed due to budget limitations, would appear as a one-shot comic book.

Pushing Daisies creator Bryan Fuller has also said that a comic-book continuation of his show is a real possibility.

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The Pilot Frenzy Continues: 26 New Shows!


We have a lot of new pilots that have been greenlit to get through today, so without further ado…

(Lots more pilot news HERE.)

ABC

Cougar Town: Comedy co-written by Scrubs creator Bill Lawrence, starring Friends’ Courteney Cox as a fortysomething mum with a 17-year-old son who finds herself single and dating again.

Untitled Kelsey Grammer Project: Previously revealed to be in the works, Former Frasier star Grammer’s new sitcom has now been given the green light to go to pilot. The actor plays a Wall Street corporate tycoon who is forced to reconnect with his family after losing his job. Written by  Everybody Loves Raymond scripter Tucker Cawley.

Funny In Farsi: Comedy based on the novel Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America by Firoozeh Dumas, which chronicles the author’s childhood as an Iranian immigrant in 1970s Newport Beach, California.

Canned: Sitcom about a group of friends who all get fired on the same day. Script is by Reaper and Desperate Housewives writer/producer Kevin Etten.

Planet Lucy: Comedy based on the book Slummy Mummy by Fiona Neill about a disaster-prone woman who quits her job to raise three kids, leaving her to balance being a stay-at-home mother with trying to rebuild the life she had before she was married with kids.

The Law: Comedy co-written by and starring Cedric The Entertainer, about reserve cops working for the LAPD who have regular jobs and lives during the week but put on a badge on weekends.

Untitled Parenting Comedy: Comedy starring comedian Anita Renfroe about being a mother who lived by the principle that family always comes first, no matter what.

Untitled Dave Hemingson Project: Drama about a group of hard-living LA entertainment lawyers.

No Heroics: A US remake of a comedy from the UK’s ITV network, about off-duty, third-rate superheroes who hang out together at a heroes-only bar to drown their sorrows and moan to each other about their lack of fame and glory.

 CBS

Good Girls: Sitcom produced by Ashton Kutcher‘s production company Katalyst, about two childhood friends who set about reinventing themselves after making some youthful mistakes.

The Good Wife: Drama about a politician’s wife who becomes a defence lawyer and starts to carve a career of her own after her husband is disgraced.

Confessions Of A Contractor: Drama written by Richard Murphy, based on his novel of the same name. It’s said to provide a provocative look at life in LA through the eyes of a successful contractor who is torn between two of his female clients who have a mystery in their shared pasts. The Shield And The Unit creator Shawn Ryan will executive produce.

I Witness: Drama about a professor who uses her psychophysiological skills to solve crimes.

The Eastmans: Medical drama about a complicated family of doctors.

Miami Trauma: Medical drama from the Jerry Bruckheimer stable, about a team of trauma surgeons trying to save critically injured patients in Miami. It’s written by Jeffrey Lieber, who wrote the original, non-sci-fi pilot script for the show that became Lost. Not to be confused with NBC’s pilot Trauma.

Three Rivers: Another medical drama, this time about organ transplants, from the point of view of doctors, donors and recipients. Former Jericho head writer Carol Barbee provides the script.

Waiting To Die: A buddy comedy about two easygoing guys.

Accidentally On Purpose: Comedy based on the autobiographical novel by Mary F. Pols about a movie critic who has a fling with a younger man – and becomes pregnant.

 

NBC

Untitled Family Comedy: Sitcom revolving around adult siblings, written by former Futurama writer and Samantha Who? consulting producer Justin Adler.

Community: Comedy set in a community college, written by Sarah Silverman Program co-creator Rob Schrab. Said to be similar in style to Stripes, the 1980s film starring Bill Murray as a taxi driver who joins the army for a joke.

100 Questions For Charlotte Payne: Ensemble comedy about a young woman’s experiences dating in New York.

State Of Romance: Comedy described as a present-day version of Jane Austen’s Pride And Prejudice, set in Chicago.

 

Fox

Cop House: Comedy about a half-way house for “troubled cops”.

 

FX

Lights Out: Drama about a former boxing champ struggling with the onset of dementia, who takes a job as a collections enforcer  to make ends meet and provide for his family. The Bucket List‘s Justin Zackham is the writer.

Fire In The Hole: Based on an Elmore Leonard short story about a federal marshal in Kentucky, his ex-wife and his father. It comes from Boomtown creator Graham Yost.

 

Epix (Cable channel due to launch in May)

Tough Trade: Drama about three generations of a famous but dysfunctional country music family. It’s created by Weeds writer Chris Offutt and the executive producer is Weeds creator Jenji Kohan.

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Networks Fly Into A Pilot Frenzy


There’s been a lot of pilot-ordering activity at the networks over the last few days (while The Choob was in his sickbed with the flu – how inconsiderate of them), on top of the shows I have already told you about HERE and HERE.

Here is a quick rundown, then, of what’s been greenlit by who.

ABC

V: A remake/reimagining of the cheesy but iconic and fondly-remembered 1983 mini-series about mice-eating alien lizards who invade Earth. The original version memorably began with giant spaceships appearing in the skies above Earth’s major cities – a visual image later homaged/ripped off by the makers of blockbuster movie Independence Day.

The TV remake will dispense with the Nazi allegory of the 1980s show and also with original creator Kenneth Johnson, who has been trying to get his own sequel/remake off the ground for years. The new version will be written by The 4400 co-creator Scott Peters and focus on a female Homeland Security agent. Like in the original, the alien “Visitors” will initially appear friendly and benevolent, only for their horrifying true motives to gradually emerge.

The 1983 original spawned a sequel mini-series and a weekly TV show that ran for only one season.

Limelight: Drama in part inspired by hip hop producer Pharrell Williams‘ experience at a performing arts school. Executive produced by Charlies Angels director McG, it will follow the students and teachers at a similar kind of school in New York. Sounds a bit like Fame for the post-millennium. It’s worth noting that the series was originally given a full series commitment just days before the start of the 2007 writers’ strike started. It was later put into redevelopment.

Untitled Jerry Bruckheimer Crime drama: Known internally as The Unknown, the show is about amateur crime fighters. Executive produced by action-movie and CSI franchise producer Bruckheimer, the pilot will by directed by CSI producer/director Danny Cannon.

Empire State: Drama about two families at odds with each other. One clan is made up of blue-collar ironworkers, the other, wealthy real-estate tycoons. At the show’s heart is a Romeo and Juliet-style love story.

I, Claudia: Drama about young prosecuting attorney Claudia McIntire who, viewers learn, will one day be a contender for US President. In the present-day, though, she is more concerned about her love life than her career.

Inside the Box: Drama, written by news producer Richard E Robbins, about a female news producer and her colleagues at a Washington DC network news bureau. Grey’s Anatomy creator Shonda Rhimes is executive producer.

Let It Go: Former Gilmore Girls star Lauren Graham stars as a talkshow host who finds it hard to follow her own advice to “let things go” when her own boyfriend dumps her.

The New Twenty: Comedy from Scrubs’ Tad Quill about two pals in their 40s who are at different stages in life – one with a newborn, the other with a kid going to college.

Threesome: To-be-retitled comedy about a guy in his 30s caught between his single-mother girlfriend and his slacker best pal.

Untitled “Brothers And Detectives” Remake: Drama about a Savannah cop who discovers when his dad dies he has an 11-year-old brother with a genius IQ. They team up to solve crimes. Written by Dexter writer Daniel Cerone and based on an Argentinian show called Brothers and Detectives.

CBS

Back: A missing-person drama about a man who disappeared in the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks, who suddenly shows up eight years later. The story follows his attempts to reconnect with his family adjust to a world that has dramatically changed. It’s written by Bones and CSI: Miami alumni Dean Widenmann.

Washington Field: Crime drama about a team of elite agents operating out of the FBI’s Washington field office

Untitled: A drama from The Unit‘s Frank Military, about a team of federal prosecutors working in Manhattan’s US Attorney’s office. 

NBC

Parenthood: Twenty years after the Steve Martin movie was released, it’s being adapted for TV as an hour-long comedy-drama that will retain the tone of the film, but update it to reflect the challenges facing parents in the new millennium and it will also feature new characters. The talent behind the show includes Friday Night Lights writer/executive producer Jason Katims and Executive Producers Ron Howard (who directed the original movie) and Brian Grazer. An earlier attempt to turn parenthood into a TV show, starring St Elsewhere’s Ed Begley Jr, lasted just 12 episodes in 1990. It did, however, feature a young Leonardo DiCaprio, David Arquette and Thora Birch, and gave a pre-Buffy Joss Whedon one of his first writing gigs.

Day One: Post-apocalyptic drama from Heroes, Alias and Lost writer Jesse Alexander, set in the wake of global catastrophe that destroys the world’s infrastructure. The show focuses on a small group of survivors. Substitute American for global and it all sounds suspiciously similar to much-missed Jericho to me…

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The Jericho Story Blows Up Again


Jericho – it’s the TV show that just won’t die. Even though nasty network chiefs killed it off not once but twice.

Now, almost a year after the final episode aired on TV, it looks as though a big-screen continuation could be on the way.

The behind-the-scenes story of Jericho is almost as bizarre and dramatic as the plot of the show. For the uninitiated Jericho debuted on CBS back in September 2006. It told the story of a major nuclear attack on the United States and the breakdown in society and the in-fighting and power struggles that followed, all seen from the perspective of the residents of Jericho, a small rural farming town in Kansas.

Mediocre ratings led to the show’s cancellation, with the season ending on a  massive cliffhanger. The show’s small but loyal fanbase weren’t about to sit back and accept that and a surprisingly effective internet campaign was launched, which involved fans sending some 20 tons of nuts to ABC executives (this referred to a scene from the season one finale in which one of the character’s repeats General Anthony McAuliffe‘s historic phrase “Nuts!” from the Battle of the Bulge).

Amazingly, for once, it worked. CBS gave the go-ahead for seven additional episodes and said if the ratings improved the show might continue. They didn’t and the show was cancelled a second time – but at least we got some sort of conclusion to the story.

That seemed to be that – but now producer/director Jon Turteltaub has been doing the rounds claiming that a big-screen version is actively in development.

He said that star Skeet Ulrich would return, along with at least some of the rest of the TV show cast but added that the film would look further outward at the effects of the attack.

He explained: “We’re developing a feature for Jericho. It would not require you to have seen the TV show but it get into life after an event like this on a national scale. It would be the bigger, full-on American version of what’s going on beyond the town in Jericho.”

The Choob really enjoyed Jericho and would like to see the story continue. However, “in development” is a very vague term that means very Little – for example, my own plans to become a billionaire and live a life of decadent self-indulgence have been in development for decades now. So until something more definitive comes along, I won’t be holding my breath.

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